SPEECH & LANGUAGE DELAY

 

Speech and language delay refers to a child’s difficulty in understanding others (receptive language) or expressing himself or herself (expressive language). Children pick up speech and language skills at a very young age and it is a cumulative development that literacy and communication skills are built upon.

E

G

A

U

G

A

L

N

A

L

E

D

Y

S

E

H

C

E

P

&

SCREEN TIME IN RELATION TO SPEECH & LANGUAGE DELAY

Face-to-face human interaction is dynamic and children pick up on communication context and cues during these interactions, which a digital device does not provide. Children develop their speech and language abilities through listening and observing others speak and communicate. Face-to-face human interaction expose them to different vocabulary, contexts and body language which builds up their speech and language skills.

Research has also shown that there is an association between screen time usage and underdeveloped white brain matter in young children. White brain matter is responsible for the development of our executive functions, which also supports our communication skills (speech and language abilities).

HOW SPEECH & LANGUAGE DELAY AFFECTS YOUR CHILD

Speech and language delay can impact your child’s social, emotional and academic aspect of their life. Children with speech and language delay may experience difficulties in expressing themselves and communicating with others, which poses challenges in socialisation and interaction.

Delays in speech and language can affect learning in young children as well. Children may struggle with completing tasks or taking instructions as speech and language delays impact their ability to understand written or verbal information.

MILESTONES FOR

SPEECH & LANGUAGE

DEVELOPMENT

By 12 Months of Age
  • Your child coos, babbles and laughs to communicate with people

  • Your child is likely to babble in baby jargon with a conversational tone

12 to 18 Months of Age
  • Your child should be producing their first words, slowly adding words to their vocabulary

  • Your child could be using gestures to communicate at times as well

  • Your child will be able to understand easy directions and answer simple questions 

18 Months to 2 Years of Age
  • Your child’s vocabulary should be increasing steadily

  • Your child will be able to put two words together to form short ‘sentences’ (e.g. mummy eat, want ball)

2 to 3 Years of Age
  • Your child is likely to be stringing up words to form short phrases or sentences

  • Most of the time, strangers should be able to understand what your child is saying

3 to 4 Years of Age
  • Your child should understand basic grammar and attempts to use it in their sentences

  • Your child will be able to engage in more complex conversations with you (e.g. telling you stories, expressing their thoughts)

4 to 5 Years of Age
  • Your child should be able to introduce himself/herself and say his or her name 

  • Your child is able to describe details when holding a conversation with you

  • Your child is likely to use different ways and words to form sentences

 
 

SITE LINKS

  • Facebook
  • Instagram
PBTS logo.png
  • Facebook - Black Circle
  • email-play-beyond-the-screen
  • Instagram - Black Circle